Co-Living Not Just for Students Anymore

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With the growing popularity of shared workspaces (think We-Work) it probably shouldn’t surprise anyone that shared living spaces are beginning to catch on. Of course, the student housing sector has been using this model for years, but in the market rate apartment world it hasn’t been seen until very recently. One issue is that local ordinances often prevent them, but as the affordable housing issue becomes more prevalent in virtually every city and town across the country, both housing providers and municipal leaders are looking for creative solutions and co-living looks like a good option. The Wall Street Journal recently ran an article that had some interesting data about this new housing approach:

This product, which is less than 10 years old and found primarily in large U.S. cities, represents only a tiny niche in the multibillion-dollar apartment industry. But developers are now preparing to build some of the largest new co-living properties in North America, a sign that the appeal of this type of housing could be broadening…

San Francisco-based co-living startup Starcity last week agreed to purchase a development site in downtown San Jose where it plans to build a 750-unit co-living building…

Rents at the company’s properties range from about $1,600 to $3,100 a month—not cheap but less than the average studio apartment rents in the Bay Area. Half of the rents at the new San Francisco property will be even further below market, affordable to people making as little as $35,000 a year, under new state legislation that streamlines the permitting process for projects with an affordable component.

“To tackle our affordability crisis we need both private sector solutions and public sector solutions,” said San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo, referring to his city’s new co-living project.